Most language endangerment today is not the result of a free choice among linguistic options but is instead the result of discrimination, of direct attack on the language as such, as well as, indirect attacks on local cultural and linguistic identities through every form of oppression and stigma which have the aim of reducing those who have them to deculturated and marginalized populations on the lowest rung of global hierarchies.

– Jane Hill (2002) –

Hello! I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My areas of interest are language documentation, revitalization, archiving best practices, pedagogical material and curriculum design, and decolonization frameworks. I am particularly interested in how, as linguists, we can use archives and their materials as a tool to aid communities in their goals of language revitalization. I primarily focus on working with the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and Hawaiian communities on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi.

In Montana, I work with entities such as the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids to use linguistics in pedagogical materials development. In Hawaiʻi, I am an archiving research assistant for Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai‘i Digital Language Archive, and collaborating on an ongoing National Science Foundation grant with the Kaniʻāina project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

I believe that linguists have an obligation to empower the communities they work with, should tailor their projects and research for those communities, and ensure that research they do ultimately leads to useful, real world applicable materials for those communities.

Please feel free to explore my site and contact me if you have any questions.

Most language endangerment today is not the result of a free choice among linguistic options but is instead the result of discrimination, of direct attack on the language as such, as well as, indirect attacks on local cultural and linguistic identities through every form of oppression and stigma which have the aim of reducing those who have them to deculturated and marginalized populations on the lowest rung of global hierarchies.

– Jane Hill (2002) –

Hello! I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My areas of interest are language documentation, revitalization, archiving best practices, pedagogical material and curriculum design, and decolonization frameworks. I am particularly interested in how, as linguists, we can use archives and their materials as a tool to aid communities in their goals of language revitalization. I primarily focus on working with the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and Hawaiian communities on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi.

In Montana, I work with entities such as the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids to use linguistics in pedagogical materials development. In Hawaiʻi, I am an archiving research assistant for Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai‘i Digital Language Archive, and collaborating on an ongoing National Science Foundation grant with the Kaniʻāina project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

I believe that linguists have an obligation to empower the communities they work with, should tailor their projects and research for those communities, and ensure that research they do ultimately leads to useful, real world applicable materials for those communities.

Please feel free to explore my site and contact me if you have any questions.

Most language endangerment today is not the result of a free choice among linguistic options but is instead the result of discrimination, of direct attack on the language as such, as well as, indirect attacks on local cultural and linguistic identities through every form of oppression and stigma which have the aim of reducing those who have them to deculturated and marginalized populations on the lowest rung of global hierarchies.

– Jane Hill (2002) –

Hello! I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My areas of interest are language documentation, revitalization, archiving best practices, pedagogical material and curriculum design, and decolonization frameworks. I am particularly interested in how, as linguists, we can use archives and their materials as a tool to aid communities in their goals of language revitalization. I primarily focus on working with the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and Hawaiian communities on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi.

In Montana, I work with entities such as the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids to use linguistics in pedagogical materials development. In Hawaiʻi, I am an archiving research assistant for Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai‘i Digital Language Archive, and collaborating on an ongoing National Science Foundation grant with the Kaniʻāina project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

I believe that linguists have an obligation to empower the communities they work with, should tailor their projects and research for those communities, and ensure that research they do ultimately leads to useful, real world applicable materials for those communities.

Please feel free to explore my site and contact me if you have any questions.

Most language endangerment today is not the result of a free choice among linguistic options but is instead the result of discrimination, of direct attack on the language as such, as well as, indirect attacks on local cultural and linguistic identities through every form of oppression and stigma which have the aim of reducing those who have them to deculturated and marginalized populations on the lowest rung of global hierarchies.

– Jane Hill (2002) –

Hello! I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My areas of interest are language documentation, revitalization, archiving best practices, pedagogical material and curriculum design, and decolonization frameworks. I am particularly interested in how, as linguists, we can use archives and their materials as a tool to aid communities in their goals of language revitalization. I primarily focus on working with the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and Hawaiian communities on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi.

In Montana, I work with entities such as the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids to use linguistics in pedagogical materials development. In Hawaiʻi, I am an archiving research assistant for Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai‘i Digital Language Archive, and collaborating on an ongoing National Science Foundation grant with the Kaniʻāina project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

I believe that linguists have an obligation to empower the communities they work with, should tailor their projects and research for those communities, and ensure that research they do ultimately leads to useful, real world applicable materials for those communities.

Please feel free to explore my site and contact me if you have any questions.

Most language endangerment today is not the result of a free choice among linguistic options but is instead the result of discrimination, of direct attack on the language as such, as well as, indirect attacks on local cultural and linguistic identities through every form of oppression and stigma which have the aim of reducing those who have them to deculturated and marginalized populations on the lowest rung of global hierarchies.

– Jane Hill (2002) –

Hello! I am a PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. My areas of interest are language documentation, revitalization, archiving best practices, pedagogical material and curriculum design, and decolonization frameworks. I am particularly interested in how, as linguists, we can use archives and their materials as a tool to aid communities in their goals of language revitalization. I primarily focus on working with the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and Hawaiian communities on Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi.

In Montana, I work with entities such as the Piegan Institute and Native Teaching Aids to use linguistics in pedagogical materials development. In Hawaiʻi, I am an archiving research assistant for Kaipuleohone, the University of Hawai‘i Digital Language Archive, and collaborating on an ongoing National Science Foundation grant with the Kaniʻāina project at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

I believe that linguists have an obligation to empower the communities they work with, should tailor their projects and research for those communities, and ensure that research they do ultimately leads to useful, real world applicable materials for those communities.

Please feel free to explore my site and contact me if you have any questions.